Posts | Comments

Beekman Securities Inc. Creates Value and Wealth For Investors 2020…

Contact Us
Peter J Klien
420 LEXINGTON AVENUE, NEW YORK
New York City
 10170 
United States
Phone:+1-212-247-3366
info@beekmansecurities.com

Mergers and Acquisitions:
Mergers and acquisitions and corporate restructuring are a big part of the corporate finance world. Suffice it to say, Wall Street bankers are always engaging Beekman Securities. Our professional expertise allows us to arrange simple or complex transactions bringing companies together whether buying or selling. When they’re not creating big companies from smaller ones, corporate finance deals do the reverse and break up companies through spinoffs, carve-outs or tracking stocks.

One plus one makes three: this equation is the special alchemy of a merger or an acquisition. The key principle behind buying a company is to create shareholder value over and above that of the sum of the two companies. Two companies together are more valuable than two separate companies – at least, that’s the reasoning behind Beekman Securities.

This rationale is particularly alluring to companies when times are tough. Strong companies will act to buy other companies to create a more competitive, cost-efficient company. The companies will come together hoping to gain a greater market share or to achieve greater efficiency. Because of these potential benefits, target companies will often agree to be purchased when they know they cannot survive alone.

Distinction between Mergers and Acquisitions
Although they are often uttered in the same breath and used as though they were synonymous, the terms merger and acquisition mean slightly different things.

When one company takes over another and clearly established itself as the new owner, the purchase is called an acquisition. From a legal point of view, the target company ceases to exist, the buyer “swallows” the business and the buyer’s stock continues to be traded. In the pure sense of the term, a merger happens when two firms, often of about the same size, agree to go forward as a single new company rather than remain separately owned and operated. This kind of action is more precisely referred to as a “merger of equals.” Both companies’ stocks are surrendered and new company stock is issued in its place. For example, both Daimler-Benz and Chrysler ceased to exist when the two firms merged, and a new company, Daimler Chrysler, was created.

SYNERGY
Synergy is the magic force that allows for enhanced cost efficiencies of the new business. Synergy takes the form of revenue enhancement and cost savings. By merging, the companies hope to benefit from the following:
• Staff reductions – As every employee knows, mergers tend to mean job losses. Consider all the money saved from reducing the number of staff members from accounting, marketing and other departments. Job cuts will also include the former CEO, who typically leaves with a compensation package.
• Economies of scale – Yes, size matters. Whether it’s purchasing stationery or a new corporate IT system, a bigger company placing the orders can save more on costs. Mergers also translate into improved purchasing power to buy equipment or office supplies – when placing larger orders, companies have a greater ability to negotiate prices with their suppliers.
• Acquiring new technology – To stay competitive, companies need to stay on top of technological developments and their business applications. By buying a smaller company with unique technologies, a large company can maintain or develop a competitive edge.
• Improved market reach and industry visibility – Companies buy companies to reach new markets and grow revenues and earnings. A merge may expand two companies’ marketing and distribution, giving them new sales opportunities. A merger can also improve a company’s standing in the investment community: bigger firms often have an easier time raising capital than smaller ones.
That said, achieving synergy is easier said than done – it is not automatically realized once two companies merge. Sure, there ought to be economies of scale when two businesses are combined, but sometimes a merger does just the opposite. In many cases, one and one add up to less than two.

Sadly, synergy opportunities may exist only in the minds of the corporate leaders and the deal makers. Where there is no value to be created, the CEO and investment bankers – who have much to gain from a successful Beekman Securities deal – will try to create an image of enhanced value. The market however, eventually sees through this and penalizes the company by assigning it a discounted share price. We’ll talk more about why Beekman Securities, may fail in a later section of this tutorial.

VARIETIES OF MERGERS
From the perspective of business structures, there is a whole host of different mergers. Here are a few types, distinguished by the relationship between the two companies that are merging:
• Horizontal merger – Two companies that are in direct competition and share the same product lines and markets.
• Vertical merger – A customer and company or a supplier and company. Think of a cone supplier merging with an ice cream maker.
• Market-extension merger – Two companies that sell the same products in different markets.
• Product-extension merger – Two companies selling different but related products in the same market.
• Conglomeration – Two companies that have no common business areas.
There are two types of mergers that are distinguished by how the merger is financed. Each has certain implications for the companies involved and for investors:

Purchase Mergers – As the name suggests, this kind of merger occurs when one company purchases another. The purchase is made with cash or through the issue of some kind of debt instrument; the sale is taxable.
Acquiring companies often prefer this type of merger because it can provide them with a tax benefit. Acquired assets can be written-up to the actual purchase price, and the difference between the book value and the purchase price of the assets can depreciate annually, reducing taxes payable by the acquiring company. We will discuss this further in part four of this tutorial.

Consolidation Mergers – With this merger, a brand new company is formed and both companies are bought and combined under the new entity. The tax terms are the same as those of a purchase merger.
As you can see, an acquisition may be only slightly different from a merger. In fact, it may be different in name only. Like mergers, acquisitions are actions through which companies seek economies of scale, efficiencies and enhanced market visibility. Unlike all mergers, all acquisitions involve one firm purchasing another – there is no exchange of stock or consolidation as a new company. Acquisitions are often congenial, and all parties feel satisfied with the deal.
Other times, acquisitions are more hostile.

Now for the Good News…..
We have just received breaking news from OUR RESEARCH DEPARTMENT.

In the race to develop the first vaccine, a mid-cap biotech company has beaten all other pharmaceutical companies.
IT WILL BE THE VERY FIRST allowed by the United States FDA to go into human clinical trial phase 1.
Now, This Company is the very first company to go into clinical trials.

The name of the company with this groundbreaking vaccine is MODERNA Inc.

MODERNA is trading ON the NASDAQ in the United States stock market, under the ticker symbol (MRNA).
OBVIOUSLY, THERE IS A LOT OF INTEREST IN THIS COMPANY AS WE SPEAK, GIVEN THE LIST OF HIGH PROFILE INVESTORS LIKE; “Bill Gates from Microsoft” WHO ARE TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE SITUATION.

HEAD OFFICE: BEEKMAN SECURITIES, INC
ADDRESS: 420 LEXINGTON AVENUE, NEW YORK, NY 10170
Phone: +1-212-247-3366
Website: www.beekmansecurities.com
Email: info@beekmansecurities.com

Leave a Reply